spatial@ucsb.local17: Poster and Plenary Session

May 15, 2017 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | spatial@ucsb.local

spatial@ucsb.local2017 Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel Thursday, June 8, 2017 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Corwin Pavilion Invitation & AgendaSpeakers You are cordially invited to attend any portion of the annual spatial@ucsb.local17 Poster and Plenary Session on Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel, which will be held on Thursday, June 8, 2017 at Corwin Pavilion. The Channel Islands Regional GIS Collaborative (CIRGIS) will be holding its annual meeting at 10:00 a.m.; the Plenary Session will begin at 11:15 a.m., and lunch will be served from 12:45 to 2:00 p.m., while attendees are encouraged to view the posters. Please view links with the detailed agenda and the bios and abstracts for the program. Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs are invited to participate in this event that showcases how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. To indicate your attendance and join us for lunch, please RSVP to Karen Doehner (kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu) before May 31,...

Center for Spatial Studies activities at Spatial Cognition 2016

Aug 15, 2016 • Categories: Event | News

The recent Spatial Cognition 2016 conference was held in Philadelphia, PA from August 2–5, 2016. Conference organizers Mary Hegarty (UCSB Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and Associate Director of the Center for Spatial Studies), Christoph Hölscher (ETH Zurich Professor of Cognitive Science), Dan Montello (UCSB Professor of Geography), and Nora S. Newcombe (Temple University Professor of Psychology and PI of SILC) brought together scholars in spatial cognition research from a variety of fields, including psychology, computer science, geography, linguistics, and anthropology. Conference sessions included paper presentations on development and education, individual differences, navigation, and language and space. A paper by Werner Kuhn, (Director of the Center for Spatial Studies) on “Conceptualizing Space” was the impetus for a panel discussion in which he participated along with Nora Newcombe, Dan Montello, and Anjan Chatterjee (University of Pennsylvania Professor and Chair of Neurology), on how the core concepts of spatial information for computation could be formulated in terms of human spatial concepts. Margaret Tarampi, postdoctoral researcher with the Center, presented a poster on comparing performance using paper-and-pencil versus computer-based assessments of spatial ability. Also from UCSB, Psychological and Brain Sciences Ph.D. candidate Alex Boone presented a paper on individual differences in navigation using the Dual Solution Paradigm, as well as a poster on the effect of verbal instructions in visually communicating uncertainty in hurricane forecasts. UCSB Assistant Professor of Geography Liz Chrastil participated in a panel discussion on using virtual reality in study navigation and presented a paper on the neural mechanisms of human path...

Kuhn FOIS 2016 Co-Chair

Jul 6, 2016 • Categories: News

Center Director Werner Kuhn is the program co-chair of the 9th International Conference on Formal Ontology in Information Systems (FOIS 2016), taking place in Annecy, France, July 6th-9th, 2016. FOIS conferences have always had a strong link to spatio-temporal information and cognition and this year’s program includes a high number of papers of interest to our...

spatial@ucsb.local2016: Poster and Plenary Session

Jun 2, 2016 • Categories: Event | News | spatial@ucsb.local

spatial@ucsb.local2016 Spatial Information for Human Health Thursday, June 2, 2016 Corwin Pavilion Agenda Speakers Posters   In addition to a poster exhibit, the event featured the Channel Islands Regional GIS (CIRGIS) presentation of their 2016 high-resolution LiDAR elevation data program and the 2015 aerial imagery acquisition project. The Plenary Session, featured presentations by David Kerr (Sansum Diabetes Center) and Aaron Blackwell (UCSB, Dept.of Anthropology), moderated by Susan Cassels (UCSB, Dept. of Geography). Presenters discussed their research and gave their perspectives on how spatial information technologies can be applied to the study and enhancement of human health. While the theme is in regard to human health, posters and demos that illustrate the application of spatial thinking on any topic related to spatial studies were presented in the Poster Exhibit. Thirty-six posters and two demos were presented to a diverse audience from the private sector and academic communities. Speakers Aaron Blackwell, Ph.D. Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara Market Integration and the Health of Amazonian Amerindians Many Amazonian peoples are currently undergoing transitions from subsistence to market based economies. Along with these changes in subsistence, come changes in diet, disease, and sociality. Here, I discuss work with two Amazonian populations, the Shuar of Ecuador and the Tsimane of Bolivia. Both have lived traditionally through small scale horticulture, hunting, fishing, and gathering, and both groups have seen substantial changes in market integration over the past decade. However, these changes have not been distributed uniformly in space. Often, those living closer to or with greater access to towns and roads experience market integration more quickly, while those living more remotely continue traditional livelihoods. We use this spatial distribution as a proxy for changes through time, to examine how market integration impacts children’s growth, body composition, disease transmission, acculturation, fertility, and other health outcomes. Bio: Aaron Blackwell is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is a human biologist and behavioral ecologist whose research examines health and life history in small scale Amazonian societies. His research examines how immune function develops in populations exposed to high levels of pathogens and how early life experiences shape health later in life in both small scale and industrialized populations. His research incorporates both field and laboratory work to examine biological outcomes. Blackwell’s other interests include examining how market integration affects health and development, senescence and aging, and ecological effects on parental investment and growth. David Kerr, M.D. FRCPE Director of Research, Sansum Diabetes Center A Diabetes Digital Village For clinicians, scientists and diabetes industries, the online diabetes #wearenotwaiting community is making it clear that the traditional approach to healthcare is not providing the quality and outcomes that are desired by adults and children...

Dangermond Lecture: ​Dirk Brockmann​

May 26, 2016 • Categories: Event | News

The Department of Geography and the Center for Spatial Studies, UCSB present The Hidden Geometry of Complex, Network-driven Contagion Phenomena Dirk Brockmann Institute for Theoretical Biology Integrated Research Institute for the Life-sciences Humboldt Universität zu Berlin 3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 26, 2016, Buchanan 1930 (lecture); 3512 Phelps Hall (reception) Flyer Video Abstract: The past decade has witnessed the emergence and global spread of new, often highly contagious and virulent pathogens that spread across the globe in a matter of weeks or months. Emergent infectious diseases have not only become a key threat to global public health, but carry the potential of yielding major economic crises. Understanding and predicting the geographic spread of emergent infectious diseases has become a major challenge to epidemiologists, public health organizations and policy makers. Large-scale computer simulations that harbor methods from statistical physics, complex network theory and dynamical systems theory have become a key tool in this context. Brockmann will report on state-of-the art research in this area and will focus on a recent theoretic approach that reveals hidden geometries in global contagion phenomena of today. Further, he will discuss how these methods have been employed to assess the import risk of cases during the 2013/14 Ebola crisis and related outbreaks. Bio: Dirk Brockmann is professor at the Institute for Theoretical Biology, the Integrated Research Institute for the Life-sciences at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin where he lead the Complex Systems group. He also has an affiliation with the Robert Koch Institute, Berlin where he leads the research group “Epidemiological Modelling of Infectious Diseases.” Brockman is a theoretical physicist and received his degree in 2003 from the University of Göttingen, Germany. Before his relocation to Berlin, we was associate professor in the Dept. of Engingeering Sciences and Applied Mathematics and the Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems at Northwestern University. His research focuses on complexity in the life-sciences, social sciences, and other disciplines including dynamical systems and complex networks and contagion phenomena on network...